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Sisters Join The Bridge Walk for International Women's Day

Sister Jacqueline, far right, joins the bridge walk.

The day was chilly and Sister Jacqueline de Verteuil was shivering in the cold, but she didn't let it stop her from joining Sister Jean Leahy for the Join Me on the Bridge event. For March 8, International Women's Day, thousands of women around the world gathered on bridges to draw attention to women's issues and their struggle for equality, rights, safety and freedom.

"All over the world," says Sister Jacqueline, "women are demanding equal rights and opportunity and are not being heard. There is so much distance between where women are and where women should be. We gather on bridges to say we want to bridge the gap."

To this end, 464 individually organized bridge gatherings took place in over 70 countries, from Mongolia to Brazil. In Toronto, the local bridge walk took place on the Belt Line bridge at Yonge and Davisville. People marched across bridges with signs and posters, declaring their stand against discrimination, inequality and violence against women.

"Some of us brought drums and tambourines," says Sister Jacqueline, "and there was music. Drivers honked their horns as they drove by, and everyone was so happy to be there. I was grateful Sister Jean invited me."

Sister Jean Leahy felt attending was vital because March 8, 2011 was the 100th anniversary of International Women's Day. "I was delighted," says Sister Jean, "to meet Leigh Bowen and Kavita Dogan, who organized the Toronto event. I look forward to next year when more women on more bridges will gather to demand an end to violence against women."

The day was chilly and Sister Jacqueline de Verteuil was shivering in the cold, but she didn't let it stop her from joining Sister Jean Leahy for the Join Me on the Bridge event. For March 8, International Women's Day, thousands of women around the world gathered on bridges to draw attention to women's issues and their struggle for equality, rights, safety and freedom.

"All over the world," says Sister Jacqueline, "women are demanding equal rights and opportunity and are not being heard. There is so much distance between where women are and where women should be. We gather on bridges to say we want to bridge the gap."

To this end, 464 individually organized bridge gatherings took place in over 70 countries, from Mongolia to Brazil. In Toronto, the local bridge walk took place on the Belt Line bridge at Yonge and Davisville. People marched across bridges with signs and posters, declaring their stand against discrimination, inequality and violence against women.

"Some of us brought drums and tambourines," says Sister Jacqueline, "and there was music. Drivers honked their horns as they drove by, and everyone was so happy to be there. I was grateful Sister Jean invited me."

Sister Jean Leahy felt attending was vital because March 8, 2011 was the 100th anniversary of International Women's Day. "I was delighted," says Sister Jean, "to meet Leigh Bowen and Kavita Dogan, who organized the Toronto event. I look forward to next year when more women on more bridges will gather to demand an end to violence against women."

By Ibrahim Ng

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