Saturday, October 21, 2017
   
Text Size

News

Christmas in Thompson
At Christmas, the Halleluia chorus will ring in our hearts because our former pastor is coming to celebrate Christmas with us.

Thompson, the third largest city of Manitoba, is a nine hour bus ride north of Winnipeg. Approximately half of our population is composed of First Nations people. Currently we have no resident priest. We celebrate on Sundays with our lay presiders, and once a month with a missionary priest who comes for Eucharist and to leave consecrated hosts.

Christmas in Haiti

Needless to say, there's no snow! Yet you will hear: "I’m dreaming of a white Christmas" playing in city supermarkets. Outside you will see huge round Santa’s perched on the corners of some buildings looking out of place, replacing the Haitian version of Papa Noël who has long white hair and beard and a long gown.

Still, the crèche is at the centre of the season and unites us all in all nations around the birth of our Savior.

Sr. Sue Mosteller honoured by Tyndale
The Board of Governors and the faculty of Tyndale University College & Seminary are pleased to present at this time Sr. Sue Mosteller for the degree Doctor of Divinity (honoris causa) — Dr. Gary V. Nelson

On Nov. 5, 2011, during the Fall Graduation Luncheon in honour of Sr. Sue Mosteller, the honourary doctorate recipient, Dr. Gary V. Nelson, President and Vice Chancellor, Tyndale University College and Seminary, introduced Sr. Sue to those assembled. Here are some of his words about Sr. Sue:

Dufferin-Peel Catholic District School Board Recognizes Religious Orders with Catholic Award of Merit

On Tuesday, Sept. 27, the Dufferin-Peel Catholic District School Board honoured seven Religious Orders and Diocesan Priests with the board’s Catholic Award of Merit. These orders were instrumental in the development of Catholic education in Dufferin-Peel.

Reflection of Sister Pat Macaulay at the Final Profession of Sister Divinia Pedro CSJ

It is an honour to be asked by you, my dear friend, Divinia (Debbie, as your family calls you) to be invited to give the reflection at your final profession. Here we are now in the reality of this joyous day of celebration of your commitment, which says to us that "God's heart is your home" within the congregation of the Sisters of St. Joseph of Toronto.

The readings that Divinia has chosen are rich. Let's look at each one and why she might have chosen it.

Villagers Meet the Sisters

On Oct. 5, 43 Village Mosaic participants arrived by bus at Morrow Park, toured the building and made their way to Room 1B Community Room. They admired the building and were impressed with the Morrow Park chapel. "What friendly people," said secretary Petrina Vrazinis, as participants filed by her door, saying hello.

100 Years of Women’s Education at St. Michael’s College: Library and Online Exhibit

On Sept. 27, 2011, three institutional archives, the University of St. Michael's College, the Sisters of Loretto and the Sisters of St. Joseph of Toronto, partnered to mark the 100th anniversary of women's education at St. Michael's. Originally, women were not admitted to St. Michael's College. The Sisters of St. Joseph and the Loretto Sisters, however, were committed to offering young women an education, and in 1911, they opened two women's colleges: St. Joseph's College and Loretto College. They were the first to offer women a university education under Catholic auspices through St. Michael's College at the University of Toronto.

160 Years Later...

One hundred and sixty year ago, October 7, 1851, the Sisters of St. Joseph arrived in Toronto. And this October, fittingly on Thanksgiving weekend, many Sisters and CSJ Associates gathered in the Morrow Park chapel to give thanks, to remember and to celebrate.

Sister Divinia Pedro Sister Divinia Pedro Makes Her Final Profession
God calls each and every one of us — our loving is our response.

"The first time I entered the doors of Morrow Park, I knew I had found my home away from home," said Sister Divinia Pedro of taking a retreat there in 1990. "Home is where love is." It has been quite a journey.

"God calls each and every one of us. Our loving is our response. For me, becoming a Sisters of St. Joseph is where I could love the most," she says.

Sisters Featured in Nuit Blanche Installation

On Sept. 27, 2011, Sisters Anne Marie Marrin, Mary Macoretta, Marie Howorth and Conrad Lauber came to see the Nuit Blanche installation about their congregation. Project originator, art teacher Paul Sabyan, with teacher-librarian Judy Pregelj and media arts teacher Suzy Rafael — three teachers who, with other teachers, planned and carried out this project and involved about 20 students.

100 Years of Women’s Education at St. Michael’s College: Library and Online Exhibit

On Sept. 27, 2011, three institutional archives, the University of St. Michael's College, the Sisters of Loretto and the Sisters of St. Joseph of Toronto, partnered to mark the 100th anniversary of women's education at St. Michael's. Originally, women were not admitted to St. Michael's College. The Sisters of St. Joseph and the Loretto Sisters, however, were committed to offering young women an education, and in 1911, they opened two women's colleges: St. Joseph's College and Loretto College. They were the first to offer women a university education under Catholic auspices through St.

Cloister: St. Joseph’s College School Art Installation for Nuit Blanche

On Oct. 1, 2011, the teachers and the students of St. Joseph's College School will be presenting Cloister as a part of Nuit Blanche events in Toronto from 7 pm until 7 am. St. Joseph's College School, pictured at right, was founded by the Sisters of St. Joseph 156 years ago.

Re-enacting the Story of God’s Love for Us

Sister Helen Kluke describes her involvement in a play where she used her pottery skills onstage in front of a live audience.

Sisters Move their Business Offices

The Sisters of St. Joseph of Toronto moved their Leadership Team and business offices from 3377 Bayview Avenue to 101 Thorncliffe Park Drive on Aug. 25, 2011. The Sisters renovated a two-storey office building in the East York area, making it accessible. The building holds the offices of their Leadership Team, business office and some ministry offices.

Missions at Home and Abroad

Father Médaille looked for a missionary spirit in the hearts of the women who joined the Sisters of St. Joseph in the seventeenth century. In his Maxims, he encouraged others to "... embrace by desire the salvation and holiness of the whole world with a spirit full of generous courage which will move you to want to do everything, to suffer everything, and to undertake everything for the advancement of the glory of God."  (Maxims of the Little Institute, # 7.)

A Legacy Of Health Care

Father Médaille wrote that God had inspired the foundation of the Congregation "precisely for the relief of the sick poor." In Toronto’s early days, the Sisters cared for the sick at home and in the fever sheds.

Blessing of St. Michael's Keenan Research Centre

On the afternoon of June 10, seven Sisters of St. Joseph attended a special blessing event. His Grace, Archbishop Thomas Collins blessed the Keenan Research Centre and the Li Ka Shing International Healthcare Education Centre, a part of St. Michael's Hospital. The Keenan Research Centre of the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute is home to researchers whose areas of expertise cover a wide variety of disciplines and methodologies.

Nourishing Body and Soul

Dating back to the 17th century, the founding constitutions of the Sisters of St. Joseph urge them to assess the needs of communities in which they live and find ways to help their most underrepresented and needy neighbours. The Sisters opened the House of Providence in 1857 to fulfill this responsibility at a time when social services in Toronto were virtually non-existent and the city’s elderly, terminally ill, poor and disabled residents had few options for care.

Opening doors through education

Within a year after their arrival in 1851, the Sisters responded to the desperate need for teachers in Catholic schools for Toronto and the neighbouring towns and villages. By 1900 the majority of Toronto Catholic elementary schools were staffed by the Sisters of St. Joseph and the Christian Brothers.

Fontbonne Ministries Honours its Volunteers

Sixty-seven people attended the Volunteer Appreciation Brunch on Sunday, May 1st, 2011 at Fontbonne Place and celebrated with the Sisters involved in the ministries, pictured above. The event offered the volunteers of all Fontbonne Ministries programs a chance to socialize, gather for brunch and hear from Fontbonne Ministries' Board Chair, Sister Thérèse Meunier, and the Sister-Directors of each program. Another cause for celebration was the fact that the Sisters of St.

Reflection on World Day of Prayer for Vocations: May 15, 2011

How and where do I find God in my life as a Sister of St. Joseph of Toronto serving the people of Fort St. James, BC?

After taking my final vows on Oct. 7, 2010, I have been blessed to share our congregation’s charism or gift of unifying and inclusive love in my ministry with our people at Fort St. James, where I continue to deepen my personal relationship with God present in creation, in the ordinariness and busyness of my life — in good and difficult times.

Sister Virginia Varley with her art. Art on the Park

Between May 5 − 8, over 250 people viewed the creations of seven artists who have been painting together for the last eight years, a group that includes Sisters Virginia Varley and Betty Lou Knox.

Sister Virginia explained the benefits of working together this way, "The advantage of painting together is that we are guaranteed a day of painting a week and during the sessions we pick up the energy of the others who are painting. We have a sense of an art community and fondly see ourselves as The Toronto Group of Seven."

A House of Compassion

When the Sisters of St. Joseph arrived in Toronto on Oct. 7, 1851, their first concern was for orphans and the sick poor. As Irish immigrants swarmed into the city — hungry, sick, in need of housing and care — Mother Delphine and her companions responded. From the orphan asylum, they went out to nurse the sick and comfort the dying.

Jubilarians 70

In September 1940, 12 young women, hoping to become Sisters of St. Joseph of Toronto, arrived at 89 St. Alban's Street from across Canada: one from St. Patrick's in Vancouver, B.C., three from St. Joseph's in Rosetown, Sask., and the rest from Ontario — one from Whitby, two from St. Catharines and five from Toronto.

Jubilarians 60

Sister Marguerite Walters
Sr. Marguerite was born and grew up in Winnipeg, Manitoba. She was taught by the Sisters of the Holy Names of Jesus and Mary in both elementary and secondary school. In high school, she studied commercial courses in preparation for a career in the business world.

© 2017 Sisters of St. Joseph of Toronto  |  E-mail: info@csj-to.ca  |  Phone: 416-467-8070  |  Website by Poverello Media